What causes bump on wrist? A critical insight on hard, itchy bump inside, below or on wrist, thumb, bone, how to get rid and pictures.

Bump on Wrist

swelling on wrist inside

Swelling on wrist

There are numerous causes of bump on wrist that can also appear on the hand. The cause of a hand or wrist bumps can be determined by the bumps appearance, examination findings, and possibly by imaging studies, including x-ray or MRI.

Definitive diagnosis requires examination of the bumps by a pathologist, either after a biopsy or removal of the bumps. The treatment recommendation will depend on the cause of the bumps.

Types of Bump on Wrist

The following are common wrist bumps:

Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

These bumpses can arise from a tendon sheath or from joint lining (synovium). Giant cell tumors of tendon sheath tend to grow slowly and can become painful. The problem with these bumps is that, while they are usually easily removable, they often come back.

Inclusion Cysts

It occurs after an injury to the hand or finger, often years later. When a penetrating injury occurs, such as a deep cut, surface cells can be pushed into the deep layers of the palm or finger. This may cause a cyst forming in this area. Patients often do not even remember the initial trauma that eventually leads to the inclusion cyst.

Carpal Boss

It occurs when cartilage grows inside the bone. This is a noncancerous tumor. An enchondroma becomes a problem when the tumor weakens the bone, which may lead to a pathologic fracture.

Ganglion Cysts

It is the most common type of bumps that causes tough lining of the small joints of the wrist forms a small pouch, and joint fluid collects within it. Ganglion cysts can also form as pouches off a tendon sheath or a knuckle joint.

A wrist ganglion cyst is a swelling that usually occurs over the back of the hand forming a bump on wrist. These are benign, fluid-filled capsules. Ganglion cysts are not cancerous, will not spread, and while they may grow in size, they will not spread to other parts of the body.

When the fluid, called synovial fluid, leaks out from these spaces, it can form a sack-like structure that we call a ganglion cyst.  The fluid within the ganglion cyst is identical to the normal fluid found within a joint or within a tendon sheath. The fluid is gelatinous, and looks and feels like jelly.

Cancers seldom originate in the hand and wrist, but there are rare cases of bone and cartilage tumors in the hand. These cancers, which originate in the hand, are called sarcomas and can be due to abnormal growth of bone, cartilage or soft-tissues.

When cancer does occur under the skin in the hand or wrist, it can also be due to a metastasis. The most common type of cancer to metastasize to the hand or wrist is lung cancer. The following are the major causes of bumps on wrist:

Bump on Wrist Causes

  • Wrist Tendonitis
    Tendonitis is a common problem that can cause wrist pain and swelling. Wrist tendonitis is due to inflammation of the tendon sheath. Treatment of wrist pain caused by tendonitis usually does not require surgery.
  • Wrist Sprains
    Wrist sprains are common injuries to the ligaments around the wrist joint. Sprains can cause problems by limiting the use of our hands.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the condition that results from dysfunction of one of the nerves in the wrist. In carpal tunnel syndrome, the median nerve is compressed, or pinched off, as it passes through the wrist joint.
  • Arthritis
    Arthritis is a problem that can cause wrist pain and difficulty performing normal activities. There are several causes of arthritis, and fortunately, there are a number of treatments for wrist arthritis.
  • Ganglion Cyst
    A ganglion cyst is a swelling that usually occurs over the back of the hand or wrist. These are benign, fluid-filled capsules. Ganglion cysts are not cancerous, will not spread, and while they may grow, they will not spread to other parts of your body.
  • Broken Wrist
    wrist fracture is a common orthopedic injury. Individual who sustain a broken wrist may be treated in a cast, or they may need surgery for the fracture.

Hard Bump on Wrist

Hard bump on wrist

Hard swelling on wrist

Ganglion cysts are benign cysts that grow off of the sheath of connective tissue surrounding the tendons in the wrist among other places. They are usually firm but slightly rubbery and may move up and down when you move the muscles in your hand or wrist. The exact cause of ganglion cysts is not entirely known.

Generally ganglion cysts do not require treatment. Occasionally they continue to grow and can become uncomfortable or can have effects on smooth motion of the tendons of the wrist. However, in the absence of these or any other symptoms, there is no need to seek treatment.

Hard bump on wrist may result from inflammation (swelling), a broken bone, and an infection of the wrist, a growth, such as a cyst or tumor, or a variety of other conditions. Inflammation of the wrist can occur from tendinitis, arthritis, bursitis or gout.

Possible wrist injuries include sprains, strains and fractures. Growths on the wrist can be benign, such as a cyst, or cancerous, such as a tumor.

Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterized by the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones where they meet to form joints. This breakdown causes the bones to rub against each other, causing stiffness, pain and loss of movement in the joint.

In the hand, the joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis are the wrist, the joint at the base of the thumb (the basal joint), the joint in the middle of the finger (proximal interphalangeal joint or PIP) and the joint closest to the nail (distal interphalangeal joint or DIP). In the finger joints, OA can lead to the formation of bony knots.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints that occurs when the body’s immune system – which normally protects us from infection – mistakenly attacks the synovium, the thin membrane that lines the joints. The result can be joint damage, pain, swelling, inflammation, loss of function and disability.

Scleroderma is an umbrella term for disorders that involve the abnormal growth of the connective tissue supporting the skin and internal organs. Although there are several different forms of scleroderma, all can cause thickening and tightening of the skin on the fingers called sclerodactyly. This can make it harder to bend or straighten the fingers.

Dupuytren’s disease, is an abnormal thickening of the fascia, a flat band of tissue beneath the skin, in the palm of the hand. This can lead to the development of firm cords and lumps that cause the fingers to bend toward the palm. The ring and little finger are most commonly affected.

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease, meaning the body’s immune system creates antibodies that attack healthy tissues, including the joints. The wrist and small joints of the hands are among those most commonly affected by lupus.

Bump inside of Wrist

Infectious arthritis refers to arthritis that is caused by an infection within the joint. Infectious arthritis is often caused by bacteria that spread through the bloodstream to the joint. Sometimes it is caused by viruses or fungi and can affect the joints of the hands.

Reactive arthritis is a chronic form of arthritis that often occurs following an infection of the genital, urinary or gastrointestinal system. Features of reactive arthritis include inflammation and swelling of the joints, eyes and structures within the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tracts, such as intestines, kidneys or bladder.

Psoriatic arthritis is a form of arthritis accompanied by the skin disease psoriasis. The skin disease often precedes the arthritis; in a small percentage the joint disease develops before the skin disease. The joint involvement of psoriatic arthritis often causes inflammation of the entire finger, giving it a sausage-like appearance.

An inclusion cyst occurs after an injury to the hand or finger, often years later. When a penetrating injury occurs, such as a deep cut, surface cells can be pushed into the deep layers of the palm or finger. This may cause a hard bump on wrist or cyst. Patients often do not even remember the initial trauma that eventually leads to the inclusion cyst.

An enchondroma occurs when cartilage grows inside the bone. This is a noncancerous tumor. An enchondroma becomes a problem when the tumor weakens the bone, which may lead to a pathologic fracture.

A giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is not a true tumor, but rather a firm bumps. These bumps can arise from a tendon sheath or from joint lining (synovium). Giant cell tumors of tendon sheath tend to grow slowly and can become painful. The problem with these bumpses is that, while they are usually easily removable, they often come back.

Bump on Wrist when bent down or below Thumb

Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath bumps can arise from a tendon sheath or from joint lining (synovium). Giant cell tumors of tendon sheath tend to grow slowly and can become painful. The problem with these bumpses is that, while they are usually easily removable, they often come back.

Patients with a carpal boss often notice a bump on wrist, but they are seldom bothered by it. If the bump does become problematic, removal of the bone is possible.

Ganglion cysts most commonly occur on the back of the hand, at the wrist joint, and can also develop on the palm side of the wrist. When found on the back of the wrist, they become more prominent when the wrist is flexed forward.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is condition occurs when the median nerve, a nerve that runs from the forearm into the hand and supplies sensation to the palm and thumb side of the hand, becomes compressed within the carpal tunnel in the wrist. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway formed by bones and a ligament, through which the median nerve and several tendons run.

Cyst on Wrist

Big bump on wrist

Cyst on wrist

The following are major types of cyst on wrist:

Ganglion Cysts

It is the most common type of bumps, representing about 80% of all hand and wrist lumps and bumps. The tough lining of the small joints of the wrist forms a small pouch, and joint fluid collects within it. Ganglion cysts can also form as pouches off a tendon sheath or a knuckle joint; these are called mucous cysts.

Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

These bumpses can arise from a tendon sheath or from joint lining (synovium). Giant cell tumors of tendon sheath tend to grow slowly and can become painful. The problem with these bumpses is that, while they are usually easily removable, they often come back.

Inclusion Cysts

When a penetrating injury occurs, such as a deep cut, surface cells can be pushed into the deep layers of the palm or finger. This may cause a cyst forming in this area. Patients often do not even remember the initial trauma that eventually leads to the inclusion cyst manifesting as a bump on wrist.

Carpal Boss

It may be misdiagnosed as a ganglion cyst, but a carpal boss is firmer and unable to be moved. Patients with a carpal boss often notice a bump, but they are seldom bothered by it. If the bump does become problematic, removal of the bone is possible.

Enchondroma

It occurs when cartilage grows inside the bone. This is a noncancerous tumor. An enchondroma becomes a problem when the tumor weakens the bone, which may lead to a pathologic fracture.

Causes of Cyst on Wrist

  • Osteoarthritis (OA).

It is a chronic condition characterized by the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones where they meet to form joints. This breakdown causes the bones to rub against each other, causing stiffness, pain and loss of movement in the joint.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

It is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints that occurs when the body’s immune system which normally protects us from infection mistakenly attacks the synovium, the thin membrane that lines the joints. The result can be joint damage, pain, swelling, inflammation, loss of function and disability.

  • Juvenile arthritis (JA).

It is the term used to describe arthritis when it begins before age 16. There are several different types of juvenile arthritis that can cause pain and swelling in the wrist and joints of the hands.

It is a form of arthritis that occurs when excess uric acid, a bodily waste product circulating in the bloodstream, is deposited as needle-shaped monosodium urate crystals in tissues of the body, including the joints.

  • Reactive arthritis

It is a chronic form of arthritis that often occurs following an infection of the genital, urinary or gastrointestinal system. Features of reactive arthritis include bump on wrist, inflammation and swelling of the joints, eyes and structures within the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tracts, such as intestines, kidneys or bladder.

  • Lupus

It is a chronic autoimmune disease, meaning the body’s immune system creates antibodies that attack healthy tissues, including the joints. The wrist and small joints of the hands are among those most commonly affected by lupus. Lupus can also cause inflammation in many organs, including the skin, heart, lungs and kidneys.

  • Psoriatic arthritis

It is a form of arthritis accompanied by the skin disease psoriasis. The skin disease often precedes the arthritis; in a small percentage the joint disease develops before the skin disease.

The joint involvement of psoriatic arthritis often causes inflammation of the entire finger, giving it a sausage-like appearance. Approximately 80 percent of people with psoriatic arthritis experience changes to the nails including pitting, thickening and/or separation from the nail bed.

  • Infectious arthritis

It refers to arthritis that is caused by an infection within the joint. Infectious arthritis is often caused by bacteria that spread through the bloodstream to the joint. Sometimes it is caused by viruses or fungi and can affect the joints of the hands.

  • Raynaud’s phenomenon

It is a condition characterized by a narrowing of the blood vessels to the extremities, usually the hands, in response to cold temperatures or stress. When blood vessels close down, fingers become cold and white, then blue, and numb or painful. When the vessels open up again, the hands become red or purple.

  • Osteoporosis

It is a condition in which the bones lose enough bumps that they become brittle and prone to breaking with slight trauma. The bones of the wrist are among those most commonly fractured in people with osteoporosis. The condition can occur with aging, inflammatory disease (such as rheumatoid arthritis) inactivity, a low-calcium diet or use of corticosteroid medications.

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

This condition occurs when the median nerve, a nerve that runs from the forearm into the hand and supplies sensation to the palm and thumb side of the hand, becomes compressed within the carpal tunnel in the wrist.

The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway formed by bones and a ligament, through which the median nerve and several tendons run. If there is swelling within the tunnel, the nerve can become compressed, resulting in pain, weakness, and/or numbness in the hand and wrist, radiating up the arm and bump on wrist.

  • Scleroderma

It is an umbrella term for disorders that involve the abnormal growth of the connective tissue supporting the skin and internal organs. Although there are several different forms of scleroderma, all can cause thickening and tightening of the skin on the fingers called sclerodactyly. This can make it harder to bend or straighten the fingers.

  • Dermatomyositis

It is an inflammatory muscle disease that often has a severe onset. Symptoms can include muscle pain and weakness, joint pain, skin rash, changes around the beds of the fingernails and roughening and cracking of the skin on the palms and fingertips, often referred to as Mechanic’s hands.

  • Dupuytren’s contracture

It is an abnormal thickening of the fascia, a flat band of tissue beneath the skin, in the palm of the hand. This can lead to the development of firm cords and lumps that cause the fingers to bend toward the palm. The ring and little finger are most commonly affected.  The disease, which occurs primarily in men older than age 40 of European descent, less commonly affects the fascia on the soles of the feet.

  • Stenosing tenosynovitis

This condition, also known as trigger finger, occurs when the pulley (one of the rings connective tissue that hold tendons of the fingers close to the bone) at the base of a finger or thumb thickens, constricting the tendon that enables the finger to move.

This can cause popping, pain or a catching feeling in the finger or thumb. In some cases, repeated use can worsen inflammation and make it difficult to straighten or bend the finger.

How to Get Rid of Bump on Wrist

The following methods are the best to help get rid of bump on wrist suggested by a pathologist:

  • Rest and Activity Modification

It is the first treatment for many common conditions that cause wrist pain is to rest the joint and allow the acute inflammation to subside. It is important, however, to use caution when resting the joint because prolonged immobilization can cause a stiff joint.

  • Ice and Heat Application

Ice packs and heat pads are among the most commonly used treatments for wrist pain. More research is yet to be taken in order to identify whether Ice or heat is the best way to treat bump on wrist.

  • Wrist Support

Support braces can help patients who have either a recent wrist sprain injury or those who tend to injure their wrists easily. These braces act as a gentle support to wrist movements. They will not prevent severe injuries but may help you perform simple activities while rehabilitating from a wrist sprain.

  • Anti-Inflammatory Medication

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pain medications, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications, especially for patients with wrist pain caused by problems such as arthritis and tendonitis and Bump on wrist

  • Cortisone injections

Cortisone is a powerful medication that treats inflammation, and inflammation is a common problem in patients with wrist pain.

  • Arthroscopic Wrist Surgery

Some wrist conditions require a surgical procedure for diagnosis or treatment. Arthroscopic surgery is a treatment option available for some causes of wrist pain.

  • Aspiration

It is usually carried out in the outpatient department of the local hospital or GP surgery where the doctor will remove as much of the contents of the ganglion as possible with a needle and syringe. The area is sometimes also injected with a dose of steroid medication to help prevent the ganglion returning, although there’s no clear evidence this reduces the risk of recurrence.

How to get rid of bump on wrist

Bump on wrist treatment

Bump on Wrist Home Remedies

  • Warm Compresses

It can reduce the discomforts associated with a ganglion cyst with regular use of warm compresses. It will increase blood circulation to the affected area and promote fluid drainage. It will also reduce pain and swelling.

  • Black Tea Bags

The acidic property of black tea helps heal a ganglion cyst and prevents it from getting worse. The tea’s anti-inflammatory nature also provides relief from pain and swelling.

  • Frankincense Oil

It is an effective astringent that can help reduce the size of a ganglion cyst and prevent it from recurring. It can also ease the pain.

  • Ginger

Ganglion cyst is causing unbearable pain; infected person can use ginger to reduce it. The anti-inflammatory property of ginger helps ease the pain and discomfort resulting from bump on wrist.

  • Turmeric

Use of turmeric to relieve pain due to a ganglion cyst. This herb has positive effects on inflammation and pain.

  • Echinacea

It increases the level of the properdine chemical in your body, which stimulates your immune system and helps shrink the ganglion cyst

  • Aloe Vera Gel

It contains an anti-inflammatory property that may help you to stimulate your healing process of a ganglion cyst. In addition, it is also very effective in reducing pain and swelling caused by a ganglion cyst.

  • Avoid Thumbing Or Draining The Cyst

The patient should avoid hitting or thumbing a ganglion cyst with a heavy object because this will only damage the living tissue around the ganglion cyst. In addition, you should also avoid popping or draining a ganglion cyst at home by puncturing this cyst with a needle. This is because it only makes the ganglion cyst worse and results in an infection.

  • Consume More Foods Containing Anti-Inflammatory Properties

Some foods containing anti-inflammatory properties are salmon, avocados, ginger, flax seeds, turmeric, tart cherries, olive oil, walnuts, blackberries, blueberries, sweet potatoes, and spinach. The patient should also avoid drinking and eating inflammatory beverages and foods such as white-flour products, sugary foods, white rice, and soda, among others.

REFERENCES

  1. What causes common hand & wrist bumpses?
  2. Ways On How To Treat A Ganglion Cyst Naturally At Home ; />
  3. Home Remedies for Ganglion Cysts :
  4. Arthritis and Diseases That Affect the Hand and Wrist :
  5. Wrist Hurts To Bend And Put Pressure On It And There Is A Bump :